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Digital Competence Framework

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Citizenship

Citizenship strand

Through these elements learners will engage with what it means to be a conscientious digital citizen who contributes positively to the digital world around them and who critically evaluates their place within this digital world. They will be prepared for and ready to encounter the positive and negative aspects of being a digital citizen and will develop strategies and tools to aid them as they become independent consumers and producers.

Interacting and collaborating

Interacting and collaborating strand

Through these elements learners will look at methods of electronic communication and know which are the most effective. Learners will also store data and use collaboration techniques successfully.

Producing

Producing strand

These elements cover the cyclical process of planning (including searching for and sourcing information), creating, evaluating and refining digital content. Although this process may apply to other areas of the framework, it is of particular importance when creating and producing digital content. It is also essential to recognise however that producing digital content can be a very creative process and this creativity is not intended to be inhibited. Digital content includes the production of text, graphics, audio, video and any combination of these for a variety of purposes. As such, this will cover multiple activities across a range of different contexts.

Data and computational thinking

Data and computational thinking strand

Computational thinking is a combination of scientific enquiry, problem solving and thinking skills. Before learners can use computers to solve problems they must first understand the problem and the methods of solving them. Through these elements learners will understand the importance of data and information literacy; they will explore aspects of collection, representation and analysis. Learners will look at how data and information links into our digital world and will provide them with essential skills for the modern, dynamic workplace.

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Digital Competence Framework in spreadsheet format XLS (75KB)

RfL routemap

strand

Citizenship

Citizenship strand

Through these elements learners will engage with what it means to be a conscientious digital citizen who contributes positively to the digital world around them and who critically evaluates their place within this digital world. They will be prepared for and ready to encounter the positive and negative aspects of being a digital citizen and will develop strategies and tools to aid them as they become independent consumers and producers.

Element

Identity, image and reputation

strand

Citizenship

Citizenship strand

Through these elements learners will engage with what it means to be a conscientious digital citizen who contributes positively to the digital world around them and who critically evaluates their place within this digital world. They will be prepared for and ready to encounter the positive and negative aspects of being a digital citizen and will develop strategies and tools to aid them as they become independent consumers and producers.

Element

Health and well-being

Learners have achieved the following:

strand

Citizenship

Citizenship strand

Through these elements learners will engage with what it means to be a conscientious digital citizen who contributes positively to the digital world around them and who critically evaluates their place within this digital world. They will be prepared for and ready to encounter the positive and negative aspects of being a digital citizen and will develop strategies and tools to aid them as they become independent consumers and producers.

Element

Digital rights, licensing and ownership

strand

Citizenship

Citizenship strand

Through these elements learners will engage with what it means to be a conscientious digital citizen who contributes positively to the digital world around them and who critically evaluates their place within this digital world. They will be prepared for and ready to encounter the positive and negative aspects of being a digital citizen and will develop strategies and tools to aid them as they become independent consumers and producers.

Element

Online behaviour and cyberbullying

Learners have achieved the following:

  • Indicate to an adult more/no more, e.g. use sounds and gestures to request 'more/no more', push item away, turn head to reject, smiling [RfL 28]
  • Attract attention, e.g. use body language/vocalisation or other method to gain attention [RfL 32]
  • Initiate social game, e.g. give symbol to adult for foot spa/battery operated toy [RfL 33]

strand

Interacting and collaborating

Interacting and collaborating strand

Through these elements learners will look at methods of electronic communication and know which are the most effective. Learners will also store data and use collaboration techniques successfully.

Element

Communication

Learners have achieved the following:

  • Communicates choice to attentive adult, e.g. show through vocalisation or gestures preferred item from choice of two [RfL 37]
  • Expresses preference for items not present via symbolic means [RfL 41].

strand

Interacting and collaborating

Interacting and collaborating strand

Through these elements learners will look at methods of electronic communication and know which are the most effective. Learners will also store data and use collaboration techniques successfully.

Element

Collaboration

Learners have achieved the following:

  • Shared attention, e.g. looks between adult and digital activity [RfL 40].

strand

Interacting and collaborating

Interacting and collaborating strand

Through these elements learners will look at methods of electronic communication and know which are the most effective. Learners will also store data and use collaboration techniques successfully.

Element

Storing and sharing

strand

Producing

Producing strand

These elements cover the cyclical process of planning (including searching for and sourcing information), creating, evaluating and refining digital content. Although this process may apply to other areas of the framework, it is of particular importance when creating and producing digital content. It is also essential to recognise however that producing digital content can be a very creative process and this creativity is not intended to be inhibited. Digital content includes the production of text, graphics, audio, video and any combination of these for a variety of purposes. As such, this will cover multiple activities across a range of different contexts.

Element

Planning, sourcing and searching

Learners have achieved the following:

  • Selects from two or more items, e.g. reach or look towards preferred item when two or more items are present (mobile device, music player, microphone, etc.). [RfL 36]

strand

Producing

Producing strand

These elements cover the cyclical process of planning (including searching for and sourcing information), creating, evaluating and refining digital content. Although this process may apply to other areas of the framework, it is of particular importance when creating and producing digital content. It is also essential to recognise however that producing digital content can be a very creative process and this creativity is not intended to be inhibited. Digital content includes the production of text, graphics, audio, video and any combination of these for a variety of purposes. As such, this will cover multiple activities across a range of different contexts.

Element

Creating

Learners have achieved the following:

  • Intentional exploration of the environment, e.g. reaches across table to touch moving toy/musical toy [RfL 27]
  • Initiates actions to achieve desired result exerting autonomy in variety of contexts, e.g. presses switch to turn on toy, activate music [RfL 43]

strand

Producing

Producing strand

These elements cover the cyclical process of planning (including searching for and sourcing information), creating, evaluating and refining digital content. Although this process may apply to other areas of the framework, it is of particular importance when creating and producing digital content. It is also essential to recognise however that producing digital content can be a very creative process and this creativity is not intended to be inhibited. Digital content includes the production of text, graphics, audio, video and any combination of these for a variety of purposes. As such, this will cover multiple activities across a range of different contexts.

Element

Evaluating and improving

strand

Data and computational thinking

Data and computational thinking strand

Computational thinking is a combination of scientific enquiry, problem solving and thinking skills. Before learners can use computers to solve problems they must first understand the problem and the methods of solving them. Through these elements learners will understand the importance of data and information literacy; they will explore aspects of collection, representation and analysis. Learners will look at how data and information links into our digital world and will provide them with essential skills for the modern, dynamic workplace.

Element

Problem solving and modelling

Learners have achieved the following:

  • Early problem solving – tries new strategy when old one fails [RfL 42]

  • Initiates actions to achieve desired result, e.g. attempts to gain adult attention to make a request [RfL 43]

strand

Data and computational thinking

Data and computational thinking strand

Computational thinking is a combination of scientific enquiry, problem solving and thinking skills. Before learners can use computers to solve problems they must first understand the problem and the methods of solving them. Through these elements learners will understand the importance of data and information literacy; they will explore aspects of collection, representation and analysis. Learners will look at how data and information links into our digital world and will provide them with essential skills for the modern, dynamic workplace.

Element

Data and information literacy

Learners have achieved the following:

  • Intentional exploration of the environment, e.g. tactile exploration of different environments [RfL 27]

A steps

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify an image of themselves, e.g. touch an image of their face on screen.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • indicate to show they want to use digital media, e.g. use a picture or symbol to request a specific digital device or media.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • respond differently to images of familiar people and other images, e.g. gesture through facial expression or body language when watching images of themselves and friends, and images related to relevant curriculum content on screen.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • communicate own choices for a small selection of objects and interactions, e.g. choose from phone/video chat by selecting appropriate device.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • turn take with an attentive adult, e.g. activating music maker and switch attention to the adult when it is the adult's turn.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • indicate a preference within a digital task, e.g. select preferred DVD or music from picture on screen.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • interact with technology in order to produce an image, sound or video output
  • show a preference for different multimedia components including image, sound and video.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use a range of appropriate cause and effect devices
  • copy actions, demonstrating a start and finish
  • remember learned responses over an extended period of time.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

B steps

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify images of familiar people, e.g. look at photos of their class group.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use a variety of digital media, including applications to create, e.g. use a camera to take a photograph.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • find a photograph/symbol/name for themselves and other familiar people, e.g. find photographs on a digital album.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • observe others online, e.g. watch familiar people with interest on screen
  • attract and draw adult attention to something/someone online, e.g. use sounds/gestures/show excitement to attract others' attention to items on screen
  • communicate simple likes/dislikes, e.g. accept or reject a digital activity offered by an adult.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • communicate their own choices in a variety of places for a selection of objects and interactions, e.g. choose video/phone/picture to communicate by selecting appropriate device.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • engage in the same digital activity in parallel with a peer, e.g. play a game with remote controlled cars demonstrating awareness of the results of the other person's input.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • show awareness of what is needed to complete a task, e.g. use given digital equipment to do a familiar task such as draw a picture/take a photograph
  • use an icon on-screen to access a specific application or website, e.g. select music CD or video DVD from on-screen icons, preferred website page, etc.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • intentionally create different text, image, sound or video outputs
  • choose preferred multimedia component from a limited choice of image, sound and video.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • show pleasure/displeasure when viewing their own work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use a range of devices to create a desired effect
  • show a growing awareness of sequences and patterns
  • follow one-step instructions.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • match identical objects or pictures independently
  • understand that one item can be represented by another means, e.g. familiar object to a photograph of that object.

C steps

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify their own work/that of others, e.g. show recognition that a piece of work is theirs when viewed on screen
  • understand that some devices require a simple password/action to access them, e.g. swipe a device to activate it.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • select preferred items on digital media, including items to create, e.g. choose draw/paint icon on website or platform
  • identify the preferred items of others, e.g. find icon for website another learner likes.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify their name on their own work and that of others, e.g. recognise their name on work around the classroom.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • interact with others online, e.g. use video chat media
  • identify their own emotions on screen and indicate to an adult.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use different forms of digital communication, e.g. experience and participate in simple voice video or text communications.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • complete a shared digital activity and be aware of the effect of the input of others, e.g. completing a jigsaw and noticing the other person has put a piece in the wrong place and moving it.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • recognise digital work from a previous session.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • choose what is needed to complete a task from given options, e.g. select camera to take photo, keyboard to make music
  • navigate through a series of icons/images to find the desired item (information/software/media), e.g. scroll through familiar website/software to find familiar activity.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • create output for different purposes using different multimedia components including letters and symbols, image, sound, animation or video.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • comment on their own work in response to specific question(s)
  • spontaneously make a change to their own work/self-correct own work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use a range of devices for different purposes
  • copy simple patterns and sequences
  • follow two-step instructions.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • match non-identical objects or pictures
  • identify items that do not belong to a set
  • separate objects that share a specified attribute, e.g. big/little, blue/green.

Nursery

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • distinguish between someone they know and someone they have never met, e.g. this links to personal and social education (PSE)/well-being and would form part of 'Stranger Danger' education.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use digital devices and media with care, e.g. name a variety of digital devices and handle appropriately.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • add their name to digital work by using initial letter, e.g. type the first initial of their name on a keyboard
  • identify some work that belongs to others, e.g. find a photograph/picture created by a familiar peer/adult.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify emotions of others on a range of digital software, e.g. talk about feelings and begin to recognise emotions; consider how actions and words can affect others; realise that behaviour has consequences; identify when they are angry worried or frightened and know who to ask for help
  • give reasons for likes/dislikes of on-screen activities.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • understand that there are different forms of online communication, e.g. e-mail, messaging, video call.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • work together with a partner/partners on a piece of digital work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • save work by clicking an icon.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • respond to and ask some questions such as why, what, how and where in relation to the task, e.g. in response to questions decide what digital equipment to use
  • navigate through a piece of software using an internal menu to find desired item.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • explore and use different multimedia components in order to capture and use text, image, sound, animation and video.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • describe in response to questions some of what has been done in the task, e.g. add comments using recording feature in software.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • complete patterns and sequences
  • follow a simple sequence of instructions
  • create one-step instructions and identify the next step.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • gather data using objects
  • recognise that there are different types of data, e.g. sort and/or match objects/photographs/symbols
  • sort familiar objects using set criteria.

Reception

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • recognise that actions have consequences and identify simple rules to keep them safe (offline and online), e.g. classroom rules/charters should incorporate digital and non-digital rules
  • recognise that data can be shared online, e.g. with adult support, find images of themselves and others for instance on the school website/school social media page, etc.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • talk about everyday use of devices and digital media, e.g. identify a range of media and digital devices from familiar experiences. Make simple observations about their uses.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • add their name to digital work, e.g. type their first name on a keyboard
  • find the name of the author on digital work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • explain how people can connect with others online, e.g. identify forms of communication (including digital)
  • use appropriate words and feelings, e.g. discuss words and feelings that could upset people – link to offline personal and social education (PSE) and well-being work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • talk about different forms of online communication, e.g. e-mail, messaging, video call and their uses.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • work together with a partner/partners on a piece of digital work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • save work by clicking an icon and understand that the work can be retrieved.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify a success criterion in response to questions, e.g. success criteria may include ensuring the subject is in the middle of the image when taking a photograph
  • find information with a variety of sources, e.g. suggest technology as a source of information and explore familiar image/symbol-based websites or apps.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • select appropriate software from a limited range to create multimedia components; create and explore the use of text, image, sound, animation and video.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • comment on work in relation to a single success criterion, e.g. add comments using recording feature in software.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • control devices by giving them instructions
  • listen to and follow a sequence of instructions from others
  • create verbal instructions
  • attempt alternative approaches to solve a problem or achieve a goal.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • begin to interpret information/data by making direct comparisons, e.g. explain why one group/set is different to another set
  • classify objects using one criterion
  • create a simple pictogram using suitable software.

Year 1

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • understand that some websites ask for information that is private and personal, e.g. identify private and personal information and discuss how to handle requests for private information – not disclosing full name, address, date of birth, school.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use digital devices within a controlled environment, time and context, e.g use for a given time limit and specified outcome.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • add their name and the date to work they have created, e.g. type their first name and surname and add a date to pieces of work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • simply explain that digital technology can be used to communicate and connect with others locally and globally, e.g. text, image, photographs, video, newsletters, e-mail, web services
  • begin to identify similarities and differences between online and offline communication, e.g follow same rules when communicating face-to-face and online
  • use appropriate words and feelings, e.g. discuss words, and acts.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • contribute to a whole-class or group online communication in one or more languages, e.g. e-mail or video call.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • collaborate with a partner on a piece of digital work.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • save work using a familiar word as a filename, e.g. child's name/keyword and understanding that this work can be retrieved.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify some success criteria in response to questions, e.g. choose appropriate colour and add title to video
  • use text when searching for information/media (image, video, sound) and use an internet browser independently, e.g. open web browser and type in one keyword for a search.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • select appropriate software to complete given tasks in order to use text, image, sound, animation and video.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • comment on work in relation to the success criteria, e.g. add comments using recording feature in software.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • follow a sequence of steps to solve a problem, e.g. predict and explain what actions are needed to make something happen
  • break down a problem into separate parts to make it easier to understand
  • create and record written instructions that others understand and can follow
  • change instructions to achieve a different outcome.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • collate and group given data using simple words, e.g. sort pictures/words
  • classify an object using more than one criterion, e.g. labelling group/set
  • record data collected in a suitable format, e.g. use tally charts, pictograms and block graphs in a simple computing package.

Year 2

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • understand that information put online leaves a digital footprint or trail, e.g. explain the meaning of digital footprint and encourage them to think critically about the information they leave online
  • identify the steps that can be taken to keep personal data and hardware secure, e.g. understand usernames and passwords, why we have them and how they are kept safe.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • begin to identify the advantages and disadvantages of digital media and devices on their lives, e.g. on their physical and mental well-being.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • add their name and the date to work they have created and give reasons why this is important, e.g. type their first name and surname, add a date to pieces of work and orally provide reasons for doing so.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use digital technology to communicate and connect with others locally and globally, e.g. text, image, photographs, video, newsletters, e-mail, web services
  • interact appropriately with others, e.g. follow the same rules when communicating face-to-face and online.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • send simple online communication in one or more languages from a single user account, e.g. e-mail (ensuring address is typed accurately) or video call.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • use an online collaborative platform to create or edit a file, e.g. word processing, presenting tools, spreadsheets.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • save work using an appropriate file name, e.g. child's name and simple title
  • use an icon to open a saved file.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • plan how to complete a task in relation to identified success criteria
  • use keywords to search for specific information to solve a problem, e.g. type keywords into a search engine and explain how their choice of website helps to solve the problem.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • create and edit multimedia components in order to develop text, image, sound, animation and video for a range of tasks.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • identify what worked and what didn't, giving some of the reasons for their thoughts.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • explain to others how a designed solution works, e.g. explain a design for a simple playground game and test, correcting any issues that arise
  • predict the outcome of simple sequences of instructions, e.g. predict what will happen if instructions are followed accurately
  • create a simple solution that tests an idea, e.g. predict what would happen if it went wrong such as the sequence of waking up to go to school.

With increasing independence learners are able to:

  • collect and organise data into groups, e.g. gather data by voting or sorting and represent in pictures, objects or drawings
  • extract information from simple tables and graphs, e.g. answer questions on table graph
  • record data collected in a variety of suitable formats, e.g. lists, tables, block graphs and pictograms.

Year 3

Learners are able to:

  • understand simple rules for sharing images and data, e.g. understand that photographs cannot be taken of others or shared online without seeking permission first
  • use strategies for creating and keeping strong, secure passwords, e.g. three to four random words joined together or using capitalisation and numbers.

Learners are able to:

  • acknowledge age restrictions and suitability of digital media and devices, e.g. locate and begin to understand PEGI ratings and age restriction guidelines
  • identify physical and emotional effects of playing/watching inappropriate content/games.

Learners are able to:

  • explain how giving credit is a sign of respect
  • explain when and how it is acceptable to use the work of others.

Learners are able to:

  • explain the similarities and differences between offline and online communications, e.g. follow the same rules when communicating face-to-face and online; discuss how online communication can be misinterpreted
  • compose clear and appropriate messages in online communities
  • identify different forms of bullying, including cyberbullying, and suggest strategies for dealing with it, e.g. screenshot, block, report.

Learners are able to:

  • exchange simple online communication in one or more languages, e.g. e-mail or video call
  • explain the advantages of communicating electronically, e.g. time saving (especially covering large distances almost instantly), resource saving, cost effectiveness, able to have multiple users from different countries communicating simultaneously, content is easily shared/saved/stored/tagged.

Learners are able to:

  • use an online collaborative platform to create or edit a file, e.g. word processing, presenting tools, spreadsheets.

Learners are able to:

  • save files to a specific location using an appropriate file name, e.g. select a file name that would be searchable at a later date
  • understand the importance of saving work periodically to avoid losing work.

Learners are able to:

  • use identified success criteria as a plan for completion of a digital task
  • develop strategies for finding information using different keywords and techniques, e.g. follow a step-by-step set of instructions on how to search effectively for information relevant to a task and select an appropriate website from skimming through a small number of sources.

Learners are able to:

  • create and edit multimedia components
  • organise a range of text, image, sound, animation and video for selected purposes.

Learners are able to:

  • give an opinion about their own work and suggest improvements, e.g. spot mistakes and use editing tools to improve their work.

Learners are able to:

  • represent a solution symbolically, e.g. the order of waking up, through a diagram or flowchart, and find the variables in the solution
  • detect and correct mistakes in sequences of instructions, e.g. identify mistakes in a solution that would cause it to fail (debug)
  • identify repetitions or loops in a sequence, e.g. identify where to shorten a set of instructions by repeating steps, for instance when learning a new song.

Learners are able to:

  • collect data, enter and begin to analyse in given formats, e.g. table, charts, databases and spreadsheets.

Year 4

Learners are able to:

  • understand how to protect themselves from online identity theft, e.g. security symbols such as a padlock, phishing, scam websites
  • understand that information put online leaves a digital footprint or trail, e.g. to aid identity theft
  • identify risks and benefits of installing software, e.g. identify possible risks of installing free and paid for software, for instance free software could download viruses to the device/computer.

Learners are able to:

  • identify the positive and negative influences of technology on health and the environment, e.g. consider the different ways free time is spent and begin to find a balance between active learning and digital activities
  • explain the importance of balancing game and screen time with other parts of their lives.

Learners are able to:

  • understand that copying the work of others and presenting it as their own is called 'plagiarism', e.g. begin to consider consequences of plagiarism
  • recognise watermarks and copyright symbols, e.g. recognise watermarks on a variety of media, know the reasons for using watermarks and explore how watermarks can be added in different software.

Learners are able to:

  • identify actions to report and prevent cyberbullying, e.g. use strategies such as not replying, reporting and saving evidence
  • identify appropriate behaviour when participating or contributing to collaborative online projects for learning, e.g. devise a set of rules.

Learners are able to:

  • exchange online communication with other learners, making use of a growing range of available features, e.g. send e-mails with attachments and change formatting (where device allows).

Learners are able to:

  • manage an online file, adding and responding to comments, e.g. create, share and edit an online file engaging in reflective discussion with teacher and/or peers.

Learners are able to:

  • understand that there are different types of storage, e.g. local, network, online, removable
  • manage files and folders locally or online, e.g. move files to a different folder.

Learners are able to:

  • develop own success criteria to be used to plan a digital task
  • find relevant information using different keywords and search techniques
  • select an appropriate website from search results and begin to consider if the content is reliable.

Learners are able to:

  • create and modify multimedia components using a range of software
  • modify and present a range of text, image, sound, animation and video for selected purposes.

Learners are able to:

  • give an opinion about their own and others' work and suggest improvements independently and collaboratively, e.g. check through their work and correct their spelling/use a spellchecker; decide if the red line underneath words point to misspelt words; use suggested spellings where appropriate
  • give reasons for choices made, e.g. discuss the benefits and limitations of a spellchecker especially with Welsh language documents.

Learners are able to:

  • demonstrate how part of a solution might need repetition
  • represent a simple solution in a flowchart that contains a looping element, e.g. identify where a repeat or loop may work in a flowchart, for instance traffic lights, and select variables.

Learners are able to:

  • begin to create data sets and extract information from them with tables, charts, spreadsheets and databases.

Year 5

Learners are able to:

  • talk about the impact that the digital content created can have, e.g. think critically about the information shared online; be aware of appropriate and inappropriate text, photographs and videos and the impact of sharing these online
  • explain why it is important to discuss their use of technology with an adult, e.g. discuss aspects of positive and negative reputation
  • maintain secure passwords on a regular basis appyling the characteristics of strong passwords and refrain from using the same password more than once.

Learners are able to:

  • understand the advantages, disadvantages, permissions and purposes of altering an image digitally and the reasons for this.

Learners are able to:

  • cite all sources when researching and explain the importance of this, e.g. create simple lists for the referencing of digital and offline sources; discuss rights and permissions associated with this
  • understand that photographs can be edited digitally and the rights and permissions associated with this.

Learners are able to:

  • demonstrate appropriate online behaviour and apply a range of strategies to protect themselves and others from possible online dangers, bullying and inappropriate behaviour, e.g. turn off comments on digital media, block users; know how to deal with and report inappropriate content and misuse.

Learners are able to:

  • exchange online communication in one or more languages, making use of a growing range of available features, e.g. when e-mailing, use search function, manage contacts
  • show an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of different forms of communication and when it is appropriate to use each, e.g. explain when video conferencing may be more appropriate than e-mail, and visa versa; explain the pros and cons of using instant messaging in social contexts; talk about purpose and audience.

Learners are able to:

  • work with others to create an online collaborative project for a specific purpose, sharing and appropriately setting permissions for other group members, e.g. editing, commenting, viewing.

Learners are able to:

  • back up files to a second or third storage device, e.g. removable storage device, network drive (locally or online)
  • search for a specific file
  • upload files from a local drive to online storage.

Learners are able to:

  • create a written plan using a template provided
  • adjust keywords and search techniques to find relevant information; begin to reference sources used in their work; consider if the content is reliable, e.g. find information using accurate terms, use a range of sources to check validity and understand the impact of incorrect information.

Learners are able to:

  • combine a range of multimedia components to produce an appropriate outcome
  • create, collect and combine a range of text, image, sound, animation and video for selected purposes.

Learners are able to:

  • explain reasons for layout and content of own work, e.g. evaluate the presentation for audience and appropriateness
  • comment on reasons for layout
  • invite feedback/responses from others
  • create groups and share work between them to allow review of work.

Learners are able to:

  • design simple sequences of instructions (algorithms) including the use of Boolean values (i.e. yes/no/true/false), e.g. within the algorithm, demonstrate the correct use of Boolean values giving an either/or response.

Learners are able to:

  • create, explore and analyse data sets, highlighting relationships within them, e.g. using spreadsheets, databases, tables and charts.

Year 6

Learners are able to:

  • explain what metadata of a photograph can include, e.g. date, time and location
  • identify benefits and risks of mobile devices broadcasting the location of the user/device, e.g. apps accessing location
  • identify secure sites by looking for privacy seals of approval, e.g. https, padlock icon
  • identify the benefits and risks of giving personal information and device access to different software
  • understand how and why people use their information and online presence to create a virtual image of themselves as a user.

Learners are able to:

  • understand the importance of balancing game and screen time with other parts of their lives, e.g. explore the reasons why they may be tempted to spend more time playing games or find it difficult to stop playing and the effect this has on their health.

Learners are able to:

  • cite all sources when researching and explain the importance of this, e.g. create simple lists for the referencing of digital and offline sources; discuss rights and permissions associated with this
  • understand that photographs can be edited digitally and discuss rights and permissions associated with this.

Learners are able to:

  • demonstrate appropriate online behaviour and apply a range of strategies to protect self and others from possible online dangers, bullying and inappropriate behaviour, e.g. turn off comments on digital media, block users; identify the risks and legal consequences of sending intimate images and content/sexting; recognise language that could be deemed to be offensive (including racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic) in online activities.

Learners are able to:

  • exchange online communication in one or more languages, making use of a growing range of available features, e.g. manage folders within e-mail including using reporting features to filter spam and make use of webcams to facilitate video calls
  • show an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of different forms of communication and when it is appropriate to use each, e.g. explain when video conferencing may be more appropriate than e-mail, and visa versa; explain the pros and cons of using instant messaging in social contexts; talk about purpose and audience.

Learners are able to:

  • work with others to create an online collaborative project for a specific purpose, sharing and appropriately setting permissions for other group members, e.g. editing, commenting, viewing.

Learners are able to:

  • create and share hyperlinks to local, network and online files
  • password-protect a file.

Learners are able to:

  • plan work independently before beginning the digital task
  • extend strategies for finding information; store previous searches and results for future use, e.g. reference through hyperlinks and bookmark a website.

Learners are able to:

  • use a range of software to produce and refine multimedia components
  • select and combine a range of text, image, sound, animation and video to produce an outcome for a selected purpose; use software tools to enhance the outcomes for specific audiences.

Learners are able to:

  • explain reasons for layout and content of own work, e.g. evaluate the presentation for audience and appropriateness
  • ensure output is appropriate for specific purpose
  • comment on reasons for layout and content
  • invite feedback/responses from others, e.g. use 'comment' in Word Online/Excel Online for asking questions or adding suggestions
  • create groups and share work between them to allow review of work.

Learners are able to:

  • demonstrate how programs or processes run by following a sequence of instructions exactly and in order
  • demonstrate how an algorithm is useful for representing a solution to a problem through testing
  • understand that changing instructions can affect or even terminate a process, e.g. moving instructions around in a program could produce unexpected outcomes or cause the program to fail altogether.

Learners are able to:

  • construct, refine and interrogate data sets to test or support an investigation.

Year 7

Learners are able to:

  • explain how their digital usage is tracked, e.g. know basic data protection laws and how organisations are responsible for the security of collected data
  • use strategies for guarding against identity theft and scams that try to access their private information online, e.g. safely manage browser history and cookies.

Learners are able to:

  • reflect on the role of digital media in their lives and their media habits, e.g. explore how the media can play a powerful role in shaping our ideas about stereotypes.

Learners are able to:

  • understand copyright, licensing, fair use, and the rights they have as creators, e.g. consider different ways people license their copyrighted work
  • explain basic copyright laws, e.g. learn that copyright is a legal system that protects their rights to creative work.

Learners are able to:

  • refine strategies to protect themselves and others from possible online dangers, e.g. when communicating online show an active ability to deal with inappropriate behaviour/misuse while actively minimising risks
  • filter the communication received, e.g. sorting out e-mails, deciding whom to follow on social media, etc.; responsibly use digital tools to interact with others using more advanced features
  • demonstrate a basic knowledge of the legal aspects linked to online behaviour, e.g. cyberbullying, harassment, false statements and publishing inappropriate content/images without consent.

Learners are able to:

  • manage a growing range of online communication accounts and the features offered within each, e.g. e-mail accounts, messaging accounts, etc.

Learners are able to:

  • take account of chronological changes made to a file and choose appropriate restore points if needed.

Learners are able to:

  • track the changes of a document/view the revision history and restore a previous version where appropriate
  • take account of file size and type, and understand that storage drives may have a limited storage space.

Learners are able to:

  • select and use effective planning techniques
  • search for necessary information and assess the quality of the information found; assess sources of information to determine if they are reliable and reference valid sources, e.g. search a range of sources and critically evaluate search findings.

Learners are able to:

  • use many features of a range of software to produce and refine multimedia components
  • use software tools to create and enhance text, image, sound, animation and video components; combine the components to produce appropriate outcomes for a range of audiences and purposes.

Learners are able to:

  • evaluate own and others' work and justify content for audience, e.g. comment on others' work in relation to layout and content
  • respond to feedback.

Learners are able to:

  • identify different parts of a process, e.g. variables, loops, case statements and comments
  • predict process outcome after modifying inputs, e.g. predicting the effect of changing/editing a set of instructions
  • modify a given flowchart to change the variables of an algorithm, e.g. add a process or a counter to it that would increment or decrement values.

Learners are able to:

  • create a data capture form, capture data, search data and create a database or spreadsheet with appropriate data input method.

Year 8

Learners are able to:

  • discuss the benefits and risks of presenting themselves in different ways online, e.g. professionally and personally.

Learners are able to:

  • demonstrate healthy online behaviours (physical and psychological) and identify unacceptable behaviour, e.g. in relation to cyberstalking, harassment, abuse of trust and radicalisation.

Learners are able to:

  • understand copyright, licensing, fair use, and the rights they have as creators
  • explain basic copyright laws, e.g. explore the ethical and legal ramifications of piracy and plagiarism and know that they are irresponsible and disrespectful
  • act responsibly as creators and users of creative work, e.g. explore decisions that creators make when exercising their creative rights and responsibilities, giving consideration to ethical, real-life issues.

Learners are able to:

  • identify high-risk situations and active strategies to avoid them, e.g. critically evaluate behaviour to limit exposure to high-risk situations
  • define and identify advanced forms of cyberbullying, how to avoid it and the consequences of such actions
  • critically evaluate the behaviours of others online and identify how they could be beneficial or damaging.

Learners are able to:

  • select and use different online communication tools for specific purposes with higher levels of competence, e.g. set up and manage an address book and organise contacts on appropriate mailing lists; independently carry out a video call for a specific purpose including screen sharing where appropriate.

Learners are able to:

  • independently select and use online collaboration tools to create a project with others.

Learners are able to:

  • use appropriate advanced file-management techniques, e.g. tagging, compression.

Learners are able to:

  • select and use a variety of effective planning techniques
  • search a variety of sources using relevant search techniques with increased complexity; organise previous searches and information for improved functionality and reference using appropriate methods, e.g. begin to categorise and group searches to make information handling more efficient; ensure that information sources are current, reliable and valid.

Learners are able to:

  • use many features of a range of software to produce and refine multimedia components
  • use software tools to create and enhance text, image, sound, animation and video components; combine the components to produce appropriate outcomes for a range of audiences and purposes
  • explore and develop formal text document structures for given purposes.

Learners are able to:

  • justify the reasons for choices and explain the advantages and disadvantages of the different outputs, e.g. produce a basic evaluation report including justification for layout and content
  • suggest and make improvements depending on feedback and self-evaluation.

Learners are able to:

  • identify patterns and opportunities for re-using code (instructions), e.g. parts of a method or instruction list that can be used to solve similar problems in different situations and/or systems
  • apply logical reasoning to a problem to formulate a solution, e.g. explain and justify how and why a solution to a problem is suitable
  • modify a given flowchart to change rules of an algorithm, e.g. adjust conditions of actions in a flowchart, for instance changing the boundaries of a counter in a loop to change how the program functions
  • change an algorithm and predict the outcome.

Learners are able to:

  • construct frequency tables for sets of data, grouped where appropriate, and perform simple analysis on data sets.

Year 9

Learners are able to:

  • understand that they have a digital footprint and that this information can be searched, copied and passed on, e.g. know how to check the security configurations of their devices and/or the software they use.

Learners are able to:

  • identify stereotypes and their impact in a range of media forms, e.g. critically reflect upon stereotypes in mass media, social media and gaming.

Learners are able to:

  • explain the legal and ethical dimensions of respecting creative work, e.g. explore the ethical and legal ramifications of piracy and plagiarism and know that they are irresponsible and disrespectful; apply understanding of the rules to different scenarios.

Learners are able to:

  • adapt online behaviour and interactions for different audiences, considering global cultural values, e.g. critically evaluate behaviour and interactions taking into account global cultural values; consider how behaviour is perceived by others.

Learners are able to:

  • select and use different online communication tools for specific purposes with higher levels of competence, e.g. set up relevant mail merge using word processing and spreadsheet software; use advanced features of e-mail provider (signature, auto-reply, read receipt, widgets).

Learners are able to:

  • independently select and use a range of online collaboration tools to create a project with others, e.g. make use of online technology to share and present ideas to others.

Learners are able to:

  • understand simple encryption and the purpose of encryption, e.g. to send sensitive data more securely
  • use relevant hyperlinks and account for the appropriate file management technique, e.g. some file storage systems will utilise dynamic hyperlinks so that if a file location is changed, the link remains intact, whereas changing file location in other systems could result in a broken hyperlink.

Learners are able to:

  • select and use a variety of effective planning techniques
  • evaluate the reliability of sources of information, justify opinions and reasons for choices and reference using appropriate methods
  • use a range of complex searches independently, e.g. and/or/+/-/not.

Learners are able to:

  • select and use a variety of appropriate software, tools and techniques to create, modify and combine multimedia components
  • use software tools to create, enhance and combine text, images, sound and video and animation for a range of audiences and purposes
  • develop a range of formal text document structures for different audiences and purposes.

Learners are able to:

  • justify the reasons for choices and explain the advantages and disadvantages of the different outputs
  • suggest and make improvements depending on feedback and self-evaluation that are relevant for audience and purpose.

Learners are able to:

  • decompose complex processes and determine the actions of individual parts, e.g. multiple WHILE, FOR and IF in either text-based or block-based programming environments
  • follow given written instructions or flowcharts to determine the function or output of a process
  • recognise that algorithms are language agnostic
  • follow and develop logical solutions, e.g. demonstrate how a problem could be solved selecting a suitable method to illustrate
  • detect and correct simple errors in algorithms, e.g. can identify and correct where a syntax error will occur, for instance missing equal signs, variable names spelled incorrectly.

Learners are able to:

Year 10

Learners are able to:

  • build a positive reputation in the context of their employment prospects, e.g. use social media responsibly
  • understand the ways websites and companies collect data online and utilise it to personalise content for their users, e.g. personal data being shared
  • recognise the risks and the uses of data/services on personal devices within the terms and conditions of a range of software and web services.

Learners are able to:

  • think critically about the different purposes and contexts of digital image editing, e.g. explore the benefits and negative points of photograph manipulation; evaluate digitally edited images in terms of context and purpose
  • take reasonable steps to avoid health problems (physical and psychological), caused by the use of technology
  • understand the legal responsibilities for disposal of technology and the environmental impact of doing so.

Learners are able to:

  • identify the key points required for creative work to be considered fair use and comply with data protection laws, e.g. explore the legal and ethical considerations involved in using the creative work of others; understand individuals' rights and responsibilities as creators and consumers of content; think critically and make ethical decisions about the use of creative works in relation to fair use; reference using formal citation conventions, such as Harvard and Oxford.

Learners are able to:

  • apply appropriate strategies to protect rights, identity, privacy and emotional safety of themselves and others in online communities, e.g. continuously evaluate online behaviour, taking into consideration the consequences of actions; take action to minimise risk to safety and security; consider global and cultural perspectives and adapt behaviour accordingly.

Learners are able to:

  • make use of available online communication services for specific purposes, justifying selections made based on their appropriateness for delivery of information.

Learners are able to:

  • reflect on choices of collaboration solutions and comment on how this could be improved to meet aims of tasks.

Learners are able to:

  • use online services to share appropriate content with a global audience, e.g. uploading content to public websites to share with specific audiences.

Learners are able to:

  • effectively plan with increasing complexity
  • search efficiently for information and evaluate the reliability of sources of information, justifying opinions and reasons for choices; reference work using appropriate methods.

Learners are able to:

  • use a variety of software, tools and techniques to create a professional individual or collaborative project outcome incorporating a range of multimedia components
  • create formal text documents for a professional audience, incorporating the use of collaborative review tools into activities
  • use appropriate indexing and referencing tools to enhance documents.

Learners are able to:

  • justify reasoning to critical audiences in terms of layout and content, e.g. produce a detailed evaluation report including justification for layout and content
  • refer appropriately to sources of information used
  • make detailed and specific changes based upon feedback and self-evaluation, as relevant.

Learners are able to:

  • independently create and design models and explain how they represent real-world problems, e.g. selecting and correctly using an appropriate method for illustrating a problem, such as a flowchart or spreadsheet
  • follow and develop logical solutions to determine actions and outputs of a program/process, e.g. follow pseudocode or a flowchart to come to an outcome, develop a written sequence of steps that could be followed.

Learners are able to:

  • use data to explain and add validity to conclusion and where possible modify conclusion and/or hypothesis.

Year 11

Learners are able to:

  • explain the ethical issues of corporate encryption, e.g building in a bypass system
  • identify and describe the data protection policies of a variety of organisations located in different countries, and how this affects the way that they work
  • identify how organisations become data compliant when using multi-national products.

Learners are able to:

  • think critically about the different purposes and contexts of digital image editing
  • take reasonable steps to avoid health problems caused by the use of technology and suggest strategies to prevent or reduce the problems (physical and psychological)
  • explain how to access support from professionals and organisations
  • understand the legal responsibilities for the disposal of technology and the environmental impact of doing so.

Learners are able to:

  • understand and reflect on the differences between taking inspiration from the creative work of others and appropriating that work without permission, e.g. appreciate the key concepts of inspiration, appropriation, copyright, and fair use and examine how they apply to creative work; understand the legal and ethical debates that surround using other people’s creative work; consider the points of view of the original creator, potential audiences, and the broader community when using materials belonging to others.

Learners are able to:

  • apply appropriate strategies to protect rights, identity, privacy and emotional safety of themselves and others in online communities, e.g. continuously evaluate online behaviour, taking into consideration the consequences of actions; take action to minimise risk to safety and security; consider global and cultural perspectives and adapt behaviour accordingly.

Learners are able to:

  • reflect on choices of online communication solution and comment on how this could be improved to meet aims of tasks.

Learners are able to:

  • reflect on choices of collaboration solutions and comment on how this could be improved to meet aims of tasks.

Learners are able to:

  • use online services to share appropriate content with a global audience, e.g. uploading content to public websites to share with specific audiences.

Learners are able to:

  • effectively plan with increasing complexity
  • consider the benefits and limitations of digital tools and information sources and of the results they produce and use these results to inform future judgements about the quality of their work
  • search efficiently for information and evaluate the reliability of sources of information, justifying opinions and reasons for choices; reference work using appropriate methods.

Learners are able to:

  • use a variety of software, tools and techniques to create a professional individual or collaborative project outcome incorporating a range of multimedia components
  • create formal text documents for a professional audience, incorporating the use of collaborative review tools into activities
  • use appropriate indexing and referencing tools to enhance documents.

Learners are able to:

  • justify reasoning to critical audiences in terms of layout and content
  • refer appropriately to sources of information used
  • make detailed and specific changes based upon feedback and self-evaluation, as relevant.

Learners are able to:

  • demonstrate the benefits of using part or whole instructions or methods (functions/procedures) in solving a problem, e.g. compartmentalise sections of a problem and call them when needed.

Learners are able to:

  • use appropriate programs to produce statistical evidence based on their own collected data/identified scenario and justify reasoning.